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EllisDee

Peripherals for Star Citizen

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I'm not sure if it was here or on RSI site but I saw a post about joysticks, basically I want peoples opinions on controller setup.

I used to play grid with an xbox 360 controller but as CR keeps banging on about immersion I thought I'd get the following setup:

http://www.amazon.co...creative=380549

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with this:

http://www.oculusvr.com/

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And possibly this:

https://leapmotion.com/

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What I'd like to know is does anyone have any experience with any of the above, can you suggest a different joystick setup?

Hopefully I can post this on the main RSI site to get Developer feedback, ie, is leap motion necessary if I have joystick/keyboard. Will all these components work with Star Citizen (I know Oculus is said to be supported) but what about the force feedback joystick & leapmotion device.

I've also seen mentions of this:

http://www.naturalpoint.com/trackir/

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But I guess if I get the Oculus this is going to be pointless.

Thoughts please :)

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Trackir is kinda useless if you have the Oculus Rift.

Im still wondering will a joystick give me an advantage over mouse players. Never used one in my entire life.

That's a good point actually, I've always used keyboard + mouse. Any people have thoughts on mouse vs joystick, I guess it comes down to, do you want to feel like your flying a spaceship or do you want to pwn people?

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I've always found the mouse to be more precise than joystick for shooting, but for quick moves and hard turns, joystick is still the best. I think i'll go some setup with stick+pedals+oculus too. Havent searched yet for a new joystick, but the one from op seems nice !

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I've always found that I run out of mousepad while trying to make loops or quick banking manouvers when using mouse & keyboard. You do not have that issue with a joystick. I'm currently using a Wingman Attack3 joystick but its seen better days. I'm going to be picking up one of these two:

Siatek x52 ($129.99)

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Or, the Siatek x52 Pro ($169.99)

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I'm rather partisan of the joystick + mouse for this game, where your character look will be important

Hmm, good point. I would like to see the game play before I order any expensive toys though. Although I really do like the Oculus

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I've always found that I run out of mousepad while trying to make loops or quick banking manouvers when using mouse & keyboard. You do not have that issue with a joystick. I'm currently using a Wingman Attack3 joystick but its seen better days. I'm going to be picking up one of these two:

Siatek x52 ($129.99)

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Or, the Siatek x52 Pro ($169.99)

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The X52 is better looking than the newer version. Is that left thing used for controlling speed? And the buttons on it?

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Jepp, it is called Throttle, it is like your Gaspedal in the car. I would like the X52 pro, if the Joystick would be like the X-65F one. If I had the money again, I would take the Thrusmaster F16 FCLS and TQS like I had it during my Descent times in the 90th. It is F***ing brilliant. But even so devastating expensive.

post-224-0-10382200-1351606644_thumb.jpg

post-224-0-48749500-1351606651_thumb.jpg

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The X52 is better looking than the newer version. Is that left thing used for controlling speed? And the buttons on it?

I agree, I like the X52 better also, but its getting hard to find now. Yes, the left controller is the throttle. All the buttons can be programmed to do whatever you wish them to do.

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I did not thought of the coffee part, i'm a smoker too, hope i wont burn my hair lightning my cig with Oculus on hehe ;)

Price isn't known yet for Oculus, but unless you have tons of money, i'd be more worried about setting the Oculus on fire when lighting a cig......and after the Oculus has caught fire your hair will probably follow pretty quickly anyways so yeah.....better get some nicotine gum or see a hypnotherapist =P

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I did not thought of the coffee part, i'm a smoker too, hope i wont burn my hair lightning my cig with Oculus on hehe ;)

Price isn't known yet for Oculus, but unless you have tons of money, i'd be more worried about setting the Oculus on fire when lighting a cig......and after the Oculus has caught fire your hair will probably follow pretty quickly anyways so yeah.....better get some nicotine gum or see a hypnotherapist =P

It could all turn out to be one really expensive and painful affair :lol:

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The X52 is better looking than the newer version. Is that left thing used for controlling speed? And the buttons on it?

Those buttons are programmable. To me, that means executing crazy inertial control maneuvers IE have each one correspond to a macro which throws a bunch of thruster commands at your fly-by-wire system and executes them in order. EG: Man on your six? Press button #34. Guess who's on who's six now, mouse?

EDIT: Sorry I derailed a bit.

As to what peripherals I'll use: definitely at the very least a joystick. Preferably with a throttle. I have a set of pedals as well, so I'll give those a go and if I like the way they work in spaceflight I will probably use them.

In a perfect world, I also want the Leapmotion to interact with those holographic displays in our cockpit. That would set immersion to a whole new level for me. Obviously, I'm interested in the Rift, but unless I get eye surgery or the thing makes accommodations for those with poor vision, it probably won't happen.

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I`ve played Descent, Freespace and X-wing ver. Tie-Fighter with the predecessor of the Thrustmaster Hotas Warthog. Was the same Stick but a different more X52 style Throttle. Had even the RCS pedals and usually only used em for Nascar and Indycar. In Space and Flieghtsims I had it mostly sit on one ofe the 4 way triggers. I was ever confused when I had to use the pedals for ruder or lower torso like Mechwarrior 2 or 3. So won`t get pedals for myself. Good Stick and Throttle should do it, was enough immersion in Desent.

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Those buttons are programmable. To me, that means executing crazy inertial control maneuvers IE have each one correspond to a macro which throws a bunch of thruster commands at your fly-by-wire system and executes them in order. EG: Man on your six? Press button #34. Guess who's on who's six now, mouse?

EDIT: Sorry I derailed a bit.

As to what peripherals I'll use: definitely at the very least a joystick. Preferably with a throttle. I have a set of pedals as well, so I'll give those a go and if I like the way they work in spaceflight I will probably use them.

In a perfect world, I also want the Leapmotion to interact with those holographic displays in our cockpit. That would set immersion to a whole new level for me. Obviously, I'm interested in the Rift, but unless I get eye surgery or the thing makes accommodations for those with poor vision, it probably won't happen.

What do the pedals do?

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http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/96/Aileron_yaw.gif

Aircraft rudders

Movement caused by the use of rudder.

On an aircraft, the rudder is a directional control surface along with the rudder-like elevator (usually attached to horizontal tail structure, if not a slab elevator ) and ailerons (attached to the wings) that control pitch and roll, respectively. The rudder is usually attached to the fin (or vertical stabilizer) which allows the pilot to control yaw about the vertical axis, i.e. change the horizontal direction in which the nose is pointing. The rudder's direction in aircraft since the "Golden Age" of flight between the two World Wars into the 21st century has been manipulated with the movement of a pair of foot pedals by the pilot, while during the pre-1919 era rudder control was most often operated with by a center-pivoted, solid "rudder bar" which usually had pedal and/or stirrup-like hardware on its ends to allow the pilot's feet to stay close to the ends of the bar's rear surface.

In practice, both aileron and rudder control input are used together to turn an aircraft, the ailerons imparting roll, the rudder imparting yaw, and also compensating for a phenomenon called adverse yaw. A rudder alone will turn a conventional fixed wing aircraft, but much more slowly than if ailerons are also used in conjunction. Use of rudder and ailerons together produces co-ordinated turns, in which the longitudinal axis of the aircraft is in line with the arc of the turn, neither slipping (under-ruddered), nor skidding (over-ruddered). Improperly ruddered turns at low speed can precipitate a spin which can be dangerous at low altitudes.

Sometimes pilots may intentionally operate the rudder and ailerons in opposite directions in a maneuver called a slip. This may be done to overcome crosswinds and keep the fuselage in line with the runway, or to more rapidly lose altitude by increasing drag, or both. The pilots of Air Canada Flight 143 used a similar technique to land the plane as it was too high above the glideslope.

Any aircraft rudder is subject to considerable forces that determine its position via a force or torque balance equation. In extreme cases these forces can lead to loss of rudder control or even destruction of the rudder. (The same principles also apply to water vessels, of course, but it is more important for aircraft because they have lower engineering margins.) The largest achievable angle of a rudder in flight is called its blowdown limit; it is achieved when the force from the air or blowdown equals the maximum available hydraulic pressure.

In multi-engined aircraft where the engines are off the centre line, the rudder may be used to trim against the yaw effect of asymmetric thrust, for example in the event of engine failure.

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I've always found that I run out of mousepad while trying to make loops or quick banking manouvers when using mouse & keyboard. You do not have that issue with a joystick. I'm currently using a Wingman Attack3 joystick but its seen better days. I'm going to be picking up one of these two:

Siatek x52 ($129.99)

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I like the look of this, cheaper than the logitech I was thinking of getting, plus its got more flashy lights which is a bonus! Makes it look kind of sci-fi like.

I can't see how the pedals would work when flying the spaceship so that could be a wasted expense.

I seen on the Oculus website you can get the dev kit for $350-$300 or something so the final product should be cheaper than that. I'll post a question to Palmer Lucky (the Dev behind Oculus) and see if I get a response regarding seeing the keyboard, taking a sip of coffee etc!

If the leapmotion device ties in to the HUD of the ship you are flying that would make my day week year life!

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