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Gremlich

Ongoing Discussion Nvidia caves, will support g-sync on free-sync monitors

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I think they realised more people were playing on Freesync monitors than G-Sync. That premium just wasn't worth it when you could save that sort of money or buy a better GPU. As this technology is for below 60FPS basicly.

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On 1/10/2019 at 12:55 AM, Boildown said:

Now people have even less of a reason to buy an AMD graphics card.

What? Like not paying for a premium feature (cough "ray tracing") when you don't care about it? Its performance will fit the bill for gamer's like me who aren't gaming as a primary hobby. Yes, it's a little late, but, prices could drop, making it more attractive.

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5 hours ago, Boildown said:

Yours is emotional.

Not at all, just pointing out a consumer fact. Were I to be emotional, I would have made some disparaging comments about your intellect or parentage. Note that I did not.

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