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Pagan_X2

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Pagan_X2 last won the day on November 1 2016

Pagan_X2 had the most liked content!

About Pagan_X2

  • Rank
    Some call me Nerf Herder, one calls me Pagal.
  • Birthday 03/13/1988

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  • Website URL
    https://robertsspaceindustries.com/citizens/pagan_x2

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Washington State
  • Interests
    Soccer (Football), Gaming, Hiking, Running!

    Battle.net - NerfHerder#1772

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5,766 profile views
  1. Appreciating the fact that the terms we use to describe a game crash or disconnect are "Crash Roberts" and "Disco / Discoed," respectively. Love it. 

  2. Ongoing Discussion Lets see your Rigs!

    @LeroyJenkins -- I went with the PCIe one. It's great. And, I picked up a second one!
  3. Oh my, a PC build guide (sort of)! A few points: 1) The Phanteks Evolv Glass case is going to cause ambient temps to be a couple degrees higher than something like a Corsair Air 540. I know this because I recently built a new rig with the Evolv case and my temps are only a couple degrees higher. It's worth noting that my old rig was running an i7-6700k locked at 4.4GHz, and my new rig is running an i7-8700k locked at 4.7GHz. Two extra cores and a higher clock speed lead to higher temps naturally. My GTX 1080 (EVGA FTW) was carried over from the old rig and is running at the same temps at the same speeds in the same games. So, if form is more important to you than function if you don't have a problem with temperatures being a few points higher, then you will love this case. (This isn't an Origin 600i Exploration vs. Carrack situation. The temp differences are so minor that they can easily be considered arbitrary.) 2) As to Juntau's point regarding overclocking: unless you are planning to keep the same PC for over eight to ten years, overclocking really doesn't matter. It's the voltage, not the temperature, that matters with regard to the lifespan of a CPU. If you can overclock your CPU with even a moderate increase to voltage, it really won't matter much. 3) While CIG has stated the game "should" be optimized for as many threads as you have, there should also be very little variance between 4/8, 6/12, and 8/16 CPU given that it's spreading the load evenly across all threads and no threads are being pushed over ~85% at any time. For example, a 40% load across 8 threads is the same as a 30% load across 12 threads is the same as a 20% load across 16 threads. Everything else being equal, i.e., given processors of the same generation from Intel for example, the one with the highest clock speed will win every time with regards to gaming regardless of thread count. Unlike "hardcore" professional software which can spread a the same 95% to 100% load across 8, 12, and 16 (or more) threads, you're just not going to see any difference by increasing core / thread count. (This, of course, requires that the game will not have excessively massive CPU spikes across all threads in certain situations. But, if a spike is bad enough to cause a hitch or soft freeze on an 8 thread CPU at 40%, the chances are pretty damn good that it will cause the same thing to the 12 and 16 thread CPU's because it's most definitely the same type of horrid physics optimization and netcode issues we are currently seeing in the 3.0 PTU.) 4) Save a bit of money on the CPU, spend it on the GPU (or an SSD!). 5) How to know when you have hit CPU nirvana, aka, "future proofing": when you are running a chip that has single threaded performance >30% over another chip of similar type -- say, an i7-8700k vs. a Ryzen 1600X -- and you are hitting either the same or very similar frame rates in the same game with the same GPU, then you know you're going to be fine for a long time to come. An example: a Sandy Bridge i7-2600k from 2011 overclocked to 4.7GHz (which was relatively easy to achieve because Sandy Bridge was awesome), is at least as good as 2017's Ryzen chips and holds it own against 2017's i7-7700k. Boost the resolution above 1080p and there is likely little to no difference as you become GPU bound at that point. (It's worth driving home that the i7-2600k turns 7 in a month or two and is held back by slow DDR3 memory to some extent.) So, if you are running resolutions above 1080p, you're even more "future proofed" than the guy with the 1080p monitor. TL;DR: There is and will be no need to buy an 8c/16t (or higher) CPU for gaming for a long time to come given 4c/8t and even 4c/4t CPU's are still performing as well as ever. I will be shocked if SC gets better frame rates with CPU's with over 8 threads simply because "more than 8 threads". I would suggest that you go with a CPU capable of no less than 4c/8t or 8c/8t if you are building a PC for SC, however. It's always nice to have headroom. Save money on your CPU and get an SSD / upgrade video card. Skip Intel's "X" enthusiast platform entirely and upgrade more stuff. There is no reason to pay more than $250 for a mobo because no one needs that many PCIe lanes. Seriously, SLI and CrossFire are fading into nonexistence. E.g., I'm running a 6c/12t i7-8700k, a GTX 1080 (16x), two PCIe Optane SSD's (4x each), and 3 M.2 SSD's on a $200 Gigabyte Aorus 7, and it's the smoothest, fastest PC I've ever built by a significant margin. Takeaway: CPU: 8 threads minimum (and recommended) GPU: Use money saved on CPU to bump up from 60 or 70 series to 80 series. Mobo: No need to go crazy. Try not to spend over $200. SSD: Yes. Yes. Yes. Get one with enough space to use as your boot drive and for SC. 250GB should be sufficient. (I would note here that the Optane 900p is noticeably faster than a 950 Pro. The $200 Raven is icing on the cake while the promotion lasts.) Memory: 3200MHz max. Anything faster is an even bigger waste of money. 16GB minimum. PSU: Don't skimp. Use http://www.jonnyguru.com/ when you find some options at the right price. Don't forget about the peripherals! I believe most people will enjoy the game more with at least one joystick -- it significantly changed my feelings about the game in a wonderfully positive way -- and you shouldn't underestimate the awesomeness of moving into resolutions beyond 1080p. Having G-SYNC / FreeSync is a nice perk, too. Remember your budget, though. Save where you can so you can spend more where you want / need.
  4. Need some advice

    Yes, the Orion is now ~340 meters long. For the sake of comparison, the Javelin is ~345 meters long (unless they continue to make it bigger).
  5. Ongoing Discussion Lets see your Rigs!

    Time to show off again. New build: i7-8700k Gigabyte Aorus Gaming 7 Mobo Phanteks Enthoo Evolv ATX Tempered Glass Case (Anthracite Grey) EVGA GTX 1080 FTW Corsair Vengeance LPX 32GB DDR4 RAM @3200MHz Intel Optane 900p 280GB SSD (Boot + SC) [Aside: Holy f*ck this thing is fast!] 3x Samsung 960 EVO M2 SSD's (1TB, 500GB, 250GB) EVGA 280mm Closed Loop CPU Cooler EVGA 850W G2 PSU Seagate Barracuda 4TB HDD ASUS ROG Swift P279Q 27" 1440p 144Hz / 1 ms with G-Sync ASUS 1440p Secondary Monitor _______________ Thrustmaster Warthog (RH) Thrustmaster T-16000 (LH) Logitech G900 Chaos Spectrum Mouse Logitech G910 Orion Spark KB Sennheiser Game One Headphones Meditating Stone Frog ones Logitech G-Series Mousepad Steel Series Mousepad P.S. Looks like my monitor is quite a bit tilted!
  6. Deon is being modest: he is a damn good pilot. Can confirm that he is friendly and patient.
  7. EVGA is giving away a 1080 Ti FTW3. Enter here: https://wn.nr/Es7KqB

    1. Pagan_X2

      Pagan_X2

      Hit me up with those extra entries! :D

  8. So, Ryzen 5 will be hitting the shelves on April 11th. AMD will be offering two 6 core / 12 thread CPU's and two 4 core / 8 thread CPU's all of which are unlocked. Pricing is as follows: Ryzen 5 1600X -- (6 core / 12 thread) // @3.6 to 4.0 GHz -- $249 Ryzen 5 1600 -- (6/12) // @3.2 to 3.6 GHz -- $219 Ryzen 5 1500X -- (4/8) // @3.5 to 3.7 GHz -- $189 Ryzen 5 1400 -- (4/8) // @3.2 to 3.4 GHz -- $169 -------------------------------------------------------------- The lone performance comparison AMD provided was for the 6/12 1600X was multithreaded performance in Cinebench paired against Intel's 4/4 i5-7600k, and it performed "up to 69% better." This is an odd choice given that no one in their right mind is buying i5 chips for multithreaded performance. In any case, if the 1600X uses the same cores as the 1800X (as one would assume it does), then $249 for a 6/12 chip of this quality is hard to beat. All that's left is for AMD to solve the problem that is causing their chips to lag pretty far behind Intel in 1080p gaming performance, especially considering Ryzen 5 (and the eventual Ryzen 3) are marketed towards lighter workstations and 1080p gaming. The 1800X is as at least as good as if not better than Intel's highest end 8/16 i7-6900k in most metrics, so it doesn't make much sense that it lags so far behind in 1080p gaming performance. (It's probably nothing more than an optimization issue. The numbers simply don't make sense.) The sooner they get this sorted out, the better off all of us will be, Intel and AMD fans alike. Competition is good! Source: http://www.techspot.com/news/68519-amd-four-ryzen-5-processors-launching-april.html
  9. Want to Sell R9 290X and i5-6600k (Lowered Prices)

    Lowered prices one last time.
  10. Nvidia 1080 Ti Released

    I'll take one ROG Strix 1080 Ti please and thank you. (Hopefully they are coming out in the next few days...) https://rog.asus.com/articles/gaming-graphics-cards/asus-announces-rog-strix-and-turbo-geforce-gtx-1080-ti/
  11. You, you're closer to death. Gratz. Deus Vult

  12. Happy Birthday :3

  13. HAPPY BIRTHDAY PAGAL-BAGEL!

    fd798758693d95ebcf2e1585a2cc2492.jpg

  14. Favorite Libation?

    "Oh don't give me none more of that Old Janx Spirit No, don't you give me none more of that Old Janx Spirit For my head will fly, my tongue will lie, my eyes will fry and I may die Won't you pour me one more of that sinful Old Janx Spirit."
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